Meet Marco Capogna

Portrait of Marco Capogna
Photo: private photo

“Over the years, we collected more and more data showing an astonishing diversity of various GABAergic neuron types and their specific roles in the healthy and pathological brain. I believe this has been my major contribution to Neuroscience so far.”

He maps the nerve cells in the human cerebral cortex

Learning more about the different types of nerve cells that make the human brain work. This is the overarching aim for professor in Neuroscience Marco Capogna, who left Oxford University to come and work at the Department of Biomedicine in Aarhus about three years ago.

Currently Marco Capogna seeks new knowledge about the nerve cell in the human cerebral cortex via studies of leftover cells from brain tumor operations performed by the neurosurgeons at Aarhus University Hospital – a study that in the long term can help patients who suffer from e.g. dementia and rehabilitation after a blood clot in the brain.

“This is a very satisfactory part of my research, since the definition of human cortical circuits should inform drug development and help preventing animal model failure in clinical translation”, Marco Capogna says.

He also works with mouse genetic models to explore the molecular, spatial and temporal organization of cellular networks and to define fundamental functional principles particularly in the brain areas known as amygdala, hippocampus and pre-frontal cortex.

“These three brain areas are important not only for normal brain operations, such as learning and memory, they are also directly affected in several brain diseases such as dementia, epilepsy and schizophrenia,” Marco Capogna explains.

Among other things he together with international colleagues discovered the key role of nerve cells (neurons) using the neurotransmitter gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) to communicate with other neurons.

“Over the years, we collected more and more data showing an astonishing diversity of various GABAergic neuron types and their specific roles in the healthy and pathological brain. I believe this has been my major contribution to Neuroscience so far”, Marco Capogna says.

Capogna has been educated in Italy and then worked for many years in Zurich, Switzerland, London and Oxford, UK, before moving to Denmark. Read more at Marco Capogna’s lab website.

Portrait of Marco Capogna
Photo: private photo

“Over the years, we collected more and more data showing an astonishing diversity of various GABAergic neuron types and their specific roles in the healthy and pathological brain. I believe this has been my major contribution to Neuroscience so far.”